Happy New Year!

A Happy New Year to you all!

I’ve got some lovely recipes to share including a chocolate cake that even I wanted to eat and an onion tart which my husband didn’t say would be improved with a little chorizo/bacon/other meat product.  That’ll be another night though.  It’s the first Monday night back at work after the holidays and I’m good for nothing.

Have a peek at some Marco/food photos from over the festive period instead.

Hibernation Mode ( plus a Tomato & Rosemary Sausage Bake)

Goodness, it’s dark.  The winter solstice was yesterday so I really shouldn’t be surprised by this lack of light.  And yet, I am.  There’s something deeper to the darkness this year.   The short December days have been covered by heavy, grey skies – no sparkling frosts or colourful sunsets to brighten the beginning and end of the daylight hours.  And we’ve had much, much more rain than Inverness is used to.  It’s all been a bit driech, really.

The upside of this crappy weather and lack of light is that I feel entirely justified in entering hibernation mode.  And, after the wonderful insanity that has been this year (new job, marathon, wedding, travels to Asia and the USA…), hibernation mode is just what I need. I’ve spent most of today curled up on the sofa with my book and Marco snoozing by my side.  There’s bread baking in the oven and the fairy lights are on.  I might have a hot bath later and after that a glass or two of red wine.  Tomorrow?  Well, tomorrow is looking like more of the same.  Bliss.

The following is a perfect meal for such days.  It’s hearty and comforting and super simple to make.    Just the thing for a dark December night.

Tomato & Rosemary Sausage Bake

(serves 2)

6 herby pork sausages

500g cherry tomatoes

250g plum tomatoes, halved

2 sprigs of rosemary

1/2 tspn dried thyme

2 garlic clove, crushed

1 tblspn balsalmic vinegar

1 tblspn olive oil

Salt & pepper

  • Heat oven to 180 oC.
  • Prick the sausages and add them to a casserole dish along with the tomatoes, herbs and garlic.  Drizzle over the balsamic vinegar and olive oil.  Add a pinch of salt and a larger pinch of pepper then use your hands to mix all the ingredients together.
  • Tuck the sausages underneath the tomatoes and bake for 30 minutes (this stops the sausages browning too soon).  After 30 mins, use tongs to place the sausages on top of the tomatoes.  Bake for another 30 mins.
  • Remove from the oven and serve the beautifully browned sausages and rich tomato & herb sauce with mashed potatoes and green beans.

Perfect Shortbread (and a pretty sunset)


I didn’t used to be good at making shortbread.  Sure, I could whip up a decent base for Strawberry Shortcake or Millionaire’s Shortbread but I had never produced a biscuit that I thought was good enough to eat unembellished with a strong cup of tea.  This had to change once I had accepted the invitation to teach a Scottish cookery course in the USA, of course.  Scotland = shortbread,

So I tried out some recipes.  A LOT of recipes.  Recipes from books, from blogs, from friends and from family and, though some of the latter ones were hugely successful in those individuals’ hands, they just didn’t work for me.  And then I tried The Three Chimney’s recipe.

For those of you who don’t know, The Three Chimney’s is a restaurant on the west coast of Skye (pics of Skye here and here).  I’ve only eaten there once and, having gone for the 9 course tasting menu plus matching wine flight, it almost bankrupt us.  Totally worth it though!  The food was amazing, the restaurant is beautiful, the service friendly and helpful,  and after 5 hours of wining and dining, I left feeling like the large amount of money we had spent had been a bargain.

Now I don’t remember if I had the shortbread when I ate at the restaurant but my lovely Aunt Anne gifted me the cookbook last year and it was here I found the Three Chimney’s recipe.  And it was perfect.  Delicate, melting, buttery and not too sweet.

I can’t, in all good conscience, reproduce the recipe here as I didn’t alter a single thing.  You can find it here, however.

Try it; you won’t regret it.

An Avocado & Goats Cheese Lunch

(Spot the ‘deliberate’ mistake.)

2014 was always going to be busy.  Wonderfully so.  My plans were to run the London Marathon in April (4 hours 11 minutes!), get married in July and go to America to teach a Scottish cookery course in September.  All fabulous but all requiring a lot of preparation.  It was do-able though.  Then I got a new job.   It’s also fabulous but the time and energy I’ve been devoting to it on top of the time and energy spent on the wedding etc has left me with little time or energy for my usual pastimes of experimenting in the kitchen, taking pictures and blogging.  I haven’t even been reading much!

Today I decided to have a wee holiday and do nothing.  By nothing, I mean I went for a long walk with Marco in the woods; I baked some bread and a lovely batch of shortbread; I read for a few hours in the sun and I took a picture of my lunch.   That’s it in the picture below.  It was a simple lunch but it was lovely.  Perfect for a sunny lazy day.

Avocado & Goats Cheese Spread

(enough to spread on two English muffins)

1 perfectly ripe avocado (don’t even bother with a hard fruit)

2 tblspns soft goats cheese

A squeeze of lemon juice

Dried chilli flakes

Sea salt flakes

  • Simply mash the avocado and goats cheese together along with the lemon juice.
  • Spread on crusty bread or crackers or (my favourites) a toasted English muffin and sprinkle with chilli flakes and sea salt.

Stovies

I am rather particular when it comes to stovies.  Sometimes when we’re out for a walk on a chilly day, we’ll stop in at a pub for some lunch.  If there are stovies on the menu (a hearty Scots dish of potatoes slowly cooked with dripping and onion), I’m always tempted to order them.  They are perfect cold weather fodder.  Problem is some folk have funny ideas about what makes stovies and, more often than not, I’m disappointed by what I’m served.

Now, these “folk” with their “funny ideas” do, admittedly, tend to simply be from areas of Scotland other than Aberdeen.  Usually, I’m all for regional variations, variety being the spice of life and whatnot.  But, really, who puts sausages in stovies??

Stovies should be moist but not runny.  The potatoes should be sliced thickly and disintegrating, not chunky or mashed.  And the meat, the meat should be shredded beef or lamb; it should not be chicken or corned beef or – splutter – sausages.  Finally, stovies should be served with oatcakes and beetroot.

Do stovies this way and you’re doing them right.  :)

Stovies (to be made the day after a roast dinner)

(serves 4)

2 tblspn dripping or butter

3 onions, sliced thickly

800g floury potatoes, peeled and sliced 1cm thick

100-200g leftover meat, shredded (lamb or beef)

2 tblspn meat jelly

1/2 cup of lamb or beef stock 

Salt and pepper

  • In a heavy based pan, fry the onions in the fat until soft and just starting to turn golden.  Remove pan from heat and pour onion and fat into a bowl.
  • Build layers of potatoes, onion/fat and meat, adding a little sprinkle of salt and pepper each time.  Once all the potato etc has been layered add the stock and meat jelly and place back on the heat.
  • Heat until the liquid starts to boil then reduce heat to low, place lid on the pan and cook gently for an hour.  Check occasionally to make sure they haven’t dried out and add a splash more stock if they look like they might.
  • Serve with oatcakes and fresh or pickled beetroot.

Lentil & Chorizo Bolognese

The London Marathon is only 12 weeks away and I’m training hard.  Up to 13 miles at the weekend now along with dark weeknight runs.  Between this, wedding preparations and challenging times at work, life is pretty full on right now.  Enjoying it all but it’s keeping me away from the kitchen, especially during the week.  Hooray for Sundays!  Sundays are for soup making, bread baking and stocking piling the freezer with food for quick weeknight meals.  The following lentil bologese/ragu/pasta sauce/whatever you want to call it is one of my current favourites.

Lentil & Chorizo Bolognese

(serves 5-6)

200g chorizo, skinned and chopped into 1cm cubes

A little olive oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

1 medium carrot, peeled and finely chopped

1 stick of celery, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tspn oregano

250g green lentils

1 tin of tomatoes

Chicken or vegetable stock

Parmesan cheese

  • Warm a little olive oil in a medium pan.  Add the chorizo and fry gently until the paprika-y fat has been release and the sausage is crisp.  Remove using a slotted spoon and put aside.
  • Fry the onions, carrot and celery in the oil for 5 minutes or until softened slightly.  Stir in the garlic and oregano and cook for a minute more.
  • Add the chorizo back to the pan along with the lentils, bay leaves and tin of tomatoes.  Stir well to combine then add enough stock to just cover the lentils.
  • Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 45 minutes.  Add more stock during the first 30 mins to keep the lentils just covered in liquid.  Once the lentils are almost cooked, stop adding stock and let the liquid reduce to a thick sauce.
  • Serve tossed with tagliatelle and grated parmesan cheese.

Salted Rosemary Bread (and some more good news)

My second piece of good news is that I got a place in the 2014 London Marathon.   Delighted!  I’ve ran this distance twice before in the Loch Ness Marathon, a great race with beautiful, peaceful route and a fantastic atmosphere amongst the runners.  It’s one I’ll most definitely do again (and maybe again after that) but, for now, I am looking forward to next year where I’ll be running a route with far less climbs (man, I hate the Dores hill) and more shouts and cheers from crowds the whole way along.  I’ll be fundraising nearer the time for the MS Society and Brain Tumour Research.  If you’d like to sponsor me,  keep an eye on this space in early spring for details.

Today’s recipe is a loaf.  The basic bread recipe is one I’ve published on these pages.   The addition of rosemary to the dough and the sprinkle of sea salt on top makes this a real treat of a snack.  It needs nothing more than a smearing of good quality butter.

Salted Rosemary Bread

(Makes one big loaf)

300ml warm water

1 tspn dry active yeast

400g strong white flour

1 tspn salt

1 tspn chopped fresh rosemary

Olive oil

1 tspn sea salt crystals 

Extra flour

  • Add the yeast to the warm water and set aside until the yeast foams a little (around 10 mins).
  • In a large bowl stir together the flour, salt, and rosemary.  Add the yeasty water and stir to create a wet dough.  Leave for 5 mins.
  • Smear a little olive oil onto your work surface and plop the dough out onto it.  Knead for a couple of minutes.  (You might need to add a tiny bit more flour if the dough is really too sticky to do anything with but don’t add much.  I just dip my hands in flour a couple of times if need be.)
  • Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with a teatowel.  Leave in a warm (not too hot!) place for 30 mins until doubled in sized.
  • Knead the dough for a couple of minutes again and place back in the bowl for another 30mins.
  • Final stage.  Line a baking tray with baking paper and dust with flour.  Place dough onto work surface and pull into a flattish rectangular shape.  Roll dough up lengthways and tuck the ends underneath.   Place seam side down and cover with the tea towel again.  Leave to double in size in the same warm place.
  • Meanwhile, heat your oven to 210 oC (or 200 oC if fan assisted).   When oven reaches the right temperature place a cake tin of hot water in the bottom of the oven.  Leave for 10 mins to let the oven get steamy.
  • Brush the risen dough lightly with water then sprinkle with the sea salt.  Dust lightly with flour then use a serrated  knife to make 3 slits across the top of the loaf.  Place in the oven and bake for 40 mins until golden.
  • Leave to cool on a rack before eating.